OD Network Connections May 2015
Facebook IconLinkedIn IconTwitter Icon
About OD Network >
About OD >
Membership >
Annual Conference >
Publications >
Resources >
Contact>
Calendar of Events

June 18, 2015
October 17-20, 2015
Chair
Matt MInahan, Ed.D.
Vice Chair
Sherry Duda
Treasurer
Magdy Mansour
Secretary
Yasmeen Burns
Christina Bell
Jaya Bohlmann
Marco Cassone
Loretta Hobbs
Norm Jones
Martha Kesler
Kris Lea
Zoe MacLeod
2025 M Street NW
Suite 800
Washington, DC 20036
312.321.5136


Each month, the Organization Development Network shares with its members articles from a number of journals to support the advancement of our members' OD practice.
Table of Contents

The Latest in OD:
Running Your Business:
The Latest in OD

firstAchievement Learning

Harry Hutson and Robert H. Schaffer - OD Practitioner


Taking Action Learning the Next Step Up

For years, leadership development professionals have understood the limitations of classroom raining and have experimented with a variety of learning modes that get the participants off the campus and into the world. For example, teams of learners may be challenged to study a topic that lies outside the expertise or responsibility of existing departments and make recommendationsto senior management. Or, teams may be asked to do a survey of employee opinion, an analysis of customer need, or an estimate of competitive threat. Team reports, as written or verbal resentations, can have positive influence, and at the same time the work involved in their preparation can teach valuable lessons about business and leadership.

IntroThe Iceberg of Organizational Cultural Change

Anton Ruis, Business2Community


Eighty seven percent of today's leaders around the world cite culture and employee engagement as one of their top organizational challenges. This is according to a recent report from Deloitte, who interviewed over 3,300 executives and HR leaders in 106 countries.

 

The data in this and other large-scale studies weave together an alarming trend around today's changing corporate landscape: Changing demands of the emerging workforce and looming leadership development challenges are growing risks for business today.

 

Article1Go Ahead, Fake Your Way through the 80-Hour Work Week

Rebecca Greenfield, Bloomberg Business


The 80-hour work week is a sham-at least for some of your savviest co-workers. A recent study outed a group of people, mostly men, who play the part of the workaholic, feigning brutal hours, while covertly keeping a more humane schedule. As their colleagues toil in their cubes, these efficient workers get home in time for dinner at 5:30 with their kids. The research, published in Organization Science and summarized inThe New York Times, calls the phenomenon "passing," because the cutters still got high performance reviews and promotions, despite putting in less time on the job.

 

Article212 Habits of Exceptional Leaders

Travis Bradberry, Entrepreneur

 

One of the most popular Dilbert comic strips in the cartoon's history begins with Dilbert's boss relaying senior leadership's explanation for the company's low profits. In response to his boss, Dilbert asks incredulously, "So they're saying that profits went up because of great leadership and down because of a weak economy?" To which Dilbert's boss replies, "These meetings will go faster if you stop putting things in context."

 

Article3Organizational Culture: An Aphorism Is "Worth a Thousand Words"

Samantha Goldman, Business 2 Community

 

In our daily lives and our daily work, we are undoubtedly impacted by subconscious messages that we have been socialized to accept. Often these are reflected in the choice of leaders that our society venerates. Other times, these messages enter our lives via quotes, mottos or aphorisms, such as, "if it ain't broke, don't fix it" that are so common they are often cliché.

 

Though they may seem harmless in everyday use, these mantras are incredibly powerful, simplistic guideposts on our thinking and how we prioritize our time and attention. For example, how many colleagues do you know who seem to operate according to the principle, "if you want something done right, you got to do it yourself?" or, "if you want something done, give it to a busy person?"

Article4The Strategist CFO: Four Orientations for Engaging in the Strategy Process

The Wall Street Journal

CEOs and boards increasingly want CFOs to not only deliver a finance organization that gets the numbers right, but also partner with them in shaping the company's strategy. But when asked what they want from a strategic CFO, their answers vary widely.

For example, CEOs typically want their CFOs to look around corners for new opportunities and potential black swans as well as help transform the company's products and markets, capitalize and plan for future growth, create and effectively communicate the corporate growth story, and improve decision-making around key investments. At the same time, boards have their own expectations concerning risk management, protecting the company's reputation and compliance and regulatory matters, among others.

Given this varied mix of responses, where should CFOs focus, and how should they orient themselves to supporting strategy?

Article5Amping Up Employee Tech Skills Is a Bargain with These Four Tools

Heather R. Huhman, Entrepreneur

 

Sharp tech talent is getting harder to find. In fact, new research suggests that American workers lag behind their international peers when it comes to tech skills.

 

Educational Testing Service surveyed adults 16-34 years of age across 22 countries measuring different competencies and published the results in January. A category called "problem solving in technology-rich environments" measured how well participants understood and effectively interacted with technology. U.S. millennials scored lower than 15 of the 19 countries participating in that category.

 

That's unfortunate, considering the rising need for tech skills and the availability of apps and e-courses for little to no cost. Tech training doesn't have to break the bank.

Article6Six Developments Impacting Field Service

John Cameron, Business 2 Community


With so many sophisticated tools now available to optimize field service operations, organizations have reached an unprecedented stage in their evolution. By leveraging developments in technology such as smartphone and tablet integration and advanced analytics, these businesses are reinventing themselves as predictive, rather than reactive, operations.

As the changes continue, field service organizations will assess how much they've evolved in the industry and set goals for the decade and beyond. This means equipping technicians with intelligent tools to deliver real-time data and deploy analytics capabilities to make strategic decisions, enhance security and optimize the IT infrastructure.

Article7This Is Why Leadership Requires Mentorship

John Brandon, Inc.com

 

Failure is an option in entrepreneurship. In fact, it's a required step on the path to success. Without failure, you can't really figure out how to push ahead, how to change, and how to succeed. Interestingly, one of the dynamics at play in this process of failure on the path to success must always involve a smart and capable guidance counselor.

Wait — does this mean going back to business school?

Not really. Finding a mentor is important when you are leading a business because that is the person you need in close proximity to help you through failure. There will be times when you will need to rely on this person's wisdom and experience. Instead of figuring out how to get through a crisis on your own, this person will be the one who supports you.

Article8Best Advice I Ever Got: Avoid Advice and Look to Yourself for Solutions First

Vivek Sharma, Inc.com


There's a certain irony in peddling advice about avoiding advice. However, I picked up this bit of wisdom early in my career, and it's proved useful for both working in and building a company.
Make no mistake: Learning from others is paramount to business success. But there's inherent value in trying to solve problems on your own.

This philosophy cemented itself into my psyche when I was working at one of my first postgraduate jobs in the San Francisco Bay Area in 1998. I joined the Blue Martini core engineering team, working with many of the people who had helped build Netscape.

Article10Three Easy Cultural Shifts to Help Engage Your Employees

The Wall Street Journal

 

Food for thought: In 2013, the percentage of Americans who believed there was at least a small chance of a zombie apocalypse was greater than the percentage of individuals worldwide who said they were engaged in their work. Truth be told, the percentage of Americans who report feeling engaged at work is actually much higher than the global number-coming in at a whopping 31.5 percent in 2014, according to a Gallup survey. As one might expect, the engagement level of managers and leaders is higher, but it isn't grounds for celebration; 38.4 percent of respondents say they are engaged by their work responsibilities. But that means 61.6 percent of surveyed managers in business and government don't really care.

 

Article1110 Low-Cost Options for Customized Leadership Development

Caroline Ceniza-Levine, Forbes

 

A recent Global Workforce Leadership Survey released by Saba, a cloud-based talent management solutions company, and WorkplaceTrends.com, a research firm, report a growing talent gap at the executive levels:

  • Almost half (46 percent) of companies surveyed cited leadership as the skill hardest to find.
  • Only 15 percent of employees feel the training they get prepares them for the next position.

If you're an aspiring leader, the good news is that employers feel the need for more leaders. The bad news is that existing training doesn't appear to meet that need. Of course, you should still take advantage of the leadership development resources your current employer offers. But if you're in transition or at a company with few or no resources, you will have to create your own leadership program.

Article12The Three Fundamental Leadership Traits that Support Enduring Organizations

Louis Efron, Forbes

 

Near the completion of the luxurious Mandalay Bay Resort and Casino in Las Vegas, all construction halted. To successfully complete the resort, the main tower's foundation needed additional support as it was sinking ½ to ¾ inch per week.

Like Mandalay Bay, many organizations find themselves in the same boat after years of operation - needing to strengthen their foundation to ensure sustainability and organizational success. To fortify the Las Vegas resort, 500 micropiles were sunk below its surface. In business, ensuring a lasting and successful organization requires foundational leadership at its core.

For the past two decades I have worked with leaders and leadership teams in various and diverse industries around the world, both big and small, good and bad. I have intently studied their behaviors and business results and uncovered three consistent traits by which foundational leaders support sustainable and successful organizations.

 

Running Your Business

running1Five Mistakes You're Making When Hiring Millennials

Suzanne Lucas, Inc.

 

An engineer got a job offer revoked when he posted to Quora asking for help in deciding between offers at Zenefits and Uber. Zenefits CEO Parker Conrad rescinded his company's offer. Business Insider calls his logic "brilliant." I agree — it brilliantly shows what is wrong with recruiting today.

When I first heard about this, I figured the engineer's question had been whiny, attack oriented or insulting to Zenefits or Uber. But, in fact, it was a well-reasoned pro-and-con list. The only problem was posting it publicly; it wasn't rude or inappropriate. But Conrad parachuted in and revoked the job offer, saying, "Definitely not Zenefits.... We really value people who 'get' what we do and who want to work here, specifically. It's not for everyone, but there are enough people out there who do want to work here that we can afford to be selective."

So, let me tell you why I think Conrad's response was not brilliant in a good way, and what is wrong with the hiring process in general.

running2Apple Watch Review: Is It Good for Business?

Brett Nuckles, Business News Daily

 

The Apple Watch can make you more productive, and it pairs nicely with business-casual dress - but so can other, less expensive smartwatches. That puts Apple's first wearable device in a bit of an awkward spot. It's an excellent product, but competing devices offer similar functionality at a fraction of the cost.

Fortunately, the Apple Watch does a lot to help justify its premium price. It offers a more polished interface than other smartwatches, as well as a bigger app library at launch than any other wearable operating system. You also get features you won't find on many other watches, like the ability to take phone calls. And like any good smartwatch, it ensures you'll never miss an important alert. Only iPhone owners need apply, though - the Apple Watch must be linked to one in order to function.

 

running3Ten Ways to Shorten Long Meetings

Dan Rockwell, Leadership Freak

 

Great meetings create efficiency.

The problem I'd like us to solve is spending too much time in long meetings. One CEO said she has to take her work home at night because her days are spent in meetings.

"...one either meets or one works. One can not do both at the same time." - Peter Drucker

 

Forward this email



This email was sent to odnetwork@odnetwork.org byodnetwork@odnetwork.org|

OD Network|2025 M Street NW|Suite 800|Washington|DC|20036
v
Forward this email



This email was sent to odnetwork@odnetwork.org byodnetwork@odnetwork.org|

OD Network|2025 M Street NW|Suite 800|Washington|DC|20036
OD Network Connections May 2015
Facebook IconLinkedIn IconTwitter Icon
About OD Network >
About OD >
Membership >
Annual Conference >
Publications >
Resources >
Contact>
Calendar of Events

June 18, 2015
October 17-20, 2015
Chair
Matt MInahan, Ed.D.
Vice Chair
Sherry Duda
Treasurer
Magdy Mansour
Secretary
Yasmeen Burns
Christina Bell
Jaya Bohlmann
Marco Cassone
Loretta Hobbs
Norm Jones
Martha Kesler
Kris Lea
Zoe MacLeod
2025 M Street NW
Suite 800
Washington, DC 20036
312.321.5136


Each month, the Organization Development Network shares with its members articles from a number of journals to support the advancement of our members' OD practice.
Table of Contents

The Latest in OD:
Running Your Business:
The Latest in OD

firstAchievement Learning

Harry Hutson and Robert H. Schaffer - OD Practitioner


Taking Action Learning the Next Step Up

For years, leadership development professionals have understood the limitations of classroom raining and have experimented with a variety of learning modes that get the participants off the campus and into the world. For example, teams of learners may be challenged to study a topic that lies outside the expertise or responsibility of existing departments and make recommendationsto senior management. Or, teams may be asked to do a survey of employee opinion, an analysis of customer need, or an estimate of competitive threat. Team reports, as written or verbal resentations, can have positive influence, and at the same time the work involved in their preparation can teach valuable lessons about business and leadership.

IntroThe Iceberg of Organizational Cultural Change

Anton Ruis, Business2Community


Eighty seven percent of today's leaders around the world cite culture and employee engagement as one of their top organizational challenges. This is according to a recent report from Deloitte, who interviewed over 3,300 executives and HR leaders in 106 countries.

 

The data in this and other large-scale studies weave together an alarming trend around today's changing corporate landscape: Changing demands of the emerging workforce and looming leadership development challenges are growing risks for business today.

 

Article1Go Ahead, Fake Your Way through the 80-Hour Work Week

Rebecca Greenfield, Bloomberg Business


The 80-hour work week is a sham-at least for some of your savviest co-workers. A recent study outed a group of people, mostly men, who play the part of the workaholic, feigning brutal hours, while covertly keeping a more humane schedule. As their colleagues toil in their cubes, these efficient workers get home in time for dinner at 5:30 with their kids. The research, published in Organization Science and summarized inThe New York Times, calls the phenomenon "passing," because the cutters still got high performance reviews and promotions, despite putting in less time on the job.

 

Article212 Habits of Exceptional Leaders

Travis Bradberry, Entrepreneur

 

One of the most popular Dilbert comic strips in the cartoon's history begins with Dilbert's boss relaying senior leadership's explanation for the company's low profits. In response to his boss, Dilbert asks incredulously, "So they're saying that profits went up because of great leadership and down because of a weak economy?" To which Dilbert's boss replies, "These meetings will go faster if you stop putting things in context."

 

Article3Organizational Culture: An Aphorism Is "Worth a Thousand Words"

Samantha Goldman, Business 2 Community

 

In our daily lives and our daily work, we are undoubtedly impacted by subconscious messages that we have been socialized to accept. Often these are reflected in the choice of leaders that our society venerates. Other times, these messages enter our lives via quotes, mottos or aphorisms, such as, "if it ain't broke, don't fix it" that are so common they are often cliché.

 

Though they may seem harmless in everyday use, these mantras are incredibly powerful, simplistic guideposts on our thinking and how we prioritize our time and attention. For example, how many colleagues do you know who seem to operate according to the principle, "if you want something done right, you got to do it yourself?" or, "if you want something done, give it to a busy person?"

Article4The Strategist CFO: Four Orientations for Engaging in the Strategy Process

The Wall Street Journal

CEOs and boards increasingly want CFOs to not only deliver a finance organization that gets the numbers right, but also partner with them in shaping the company's strategy. But when asked what they want from a strategic CFO, their answers vary widely.

For example, CEOs typically want their CFOs to look around corners for new opportunities and potential black swans as well as help transform the company's products and markets, capitalize and plan for future growth, create and effectively communicate the corporate growth story, and improve decision-making around key investments. At the same time, boards have their own expectations concerning risk management, protecting the company's reputation and compliance and regulatory matters, among others.

Given this varied mix of responses, where should CFOs focus, and how should they orient themselves to supporting strategy?

Article5Amping Up Employee Tech Skills Is a Bargain with These Four Tools

Heather R. Huhman, Entrepreneur

 

Sharp tech talent is getting harder to find. In fact, new research suggests that American workers lag behind their international peers when it comes to tech skills.

 

Educational Testing Service surveyed adults 16-34 years of age across 22 countries measuring different competencies and published the results in January. A category called "problem solving in technology-rich environments" measured how well participants understood and effectively interacted with technology. U.S. millennials scored lower than 15 of the 19 countries participating in that category.

 

That's unfortunate, considering the rising need for tech skills and the availability of apps and e-courses for little to no cost. Tech training doesn't have to break the bank.

Article6Six Developments Impacting Field Service

John Cameron, Business 2 Community


With so many sophisticated tools now available to optimize field service operations, organizations have reached an unprecedented stage in their evolution. By leveraging developments in technology such as smartphone and tablet integration and advanced analytics, these businesses are reinventing themselves as predictive, rather than reactive, operations.

As the changes continue, field service organizations will assess how much they've evolved in the industry and set goals for the decade and beyond. This means equipping technicians with intelligent tools to deliver real-time data and deploy analytics capabilities to make strategic decisions, enhance security and optimize the IT infrastructure.

Article7This Is Why Leadership Requires Mentorship

John Brandon, Inc.com

 

Failure is an option in entrepreneurship. In fact, it's a required step on the path to success. Without failure, you can't really figure out how to push ahead, how to change, and how to succeed. Interestingly, one of the dynamics at play in this process of failure on the path to success must always involve a smart and capable guidance counselor.

Wait — does this mean going back to business school?

Not really. Finding a mentor is important when you are leading a business because that is the person you need in close proximity to help you through failure. There will be times when you will need to rely on this person's wisdom and experience. Instead of figuring out how to get through a crisis on your own, this person will be the one who supports you.

Article8Best Advice I Ever Got: Avoid Advice and Look to Yourself for Solutions First

Vivek Sharma, Inc.com


There's a certain irony in peddling advice about avoiding advice. However, I picked up this bit of wisdom early in my career, and it's proved useful for both working in and building a company.
Make no mistake: Learning from others is paramount to business success. But there's inherent value in trying to solve problems on your own.

This philosophy cemented itself into my psyche when I was working at one of my first postgraduate jobs in the San Francisco Bay Area in 1998. I joined the Blue Martini core engineering team, working with many of the people who had helped build Netscape.

Article10Three Easy Cultural Shifts to Help Engage Your Employees

The Wall Street Journal

 

Food for thought: In 2013, the percentage of Americans who believed there was at least a small chance of a zombie apocalypse was greater than the percentage of individuals worldwide who said they were engaged in their work. Truth be told, the percentage of Americans who report feeling engaged at work is actually much higher than the global number-coming in at a whopping 31.5 percent in 2014, according to a Gallup survey. As one might expect, the engagement level of managers and leaders is higher, but it isn't grounds for celebration; 38.4 percent of respondents say they are engaged by their work responsibilities. But that means 61.6 percent of surveyed managers in business and government don't really care.

 

Article1110 Low-Cost Options for Customized Leadership Development

Caroline Ceniza-Levine, Forbes

 

A recent Global Workforce Leadership Survey released by Saba, a cloud-based talent management solutions company, and WorkplaceTrends.com, a research firm, report a growing talent gap at the executive levels:

  • Almost half (46 percent) of companies surveyed cited leadership as the skill hardest to find.
  • Only 15 percent of employees feel the training they get prepares them for the next position.

If you're an aspiring leader, the good news is that employers feel the need for more leaders. The bad news is that existing training doesn't appear to meet that need. Of course, you should still take advantage of the leadership development resources your current employer offers. But if you're in transition or at a company with few or no resources, you will have to create your own leadership program.

Article12The Three Fundamental Leadership Traits that Support Enduring Organizations

Louis Efron, Forbes

 

Near the completion of the luxurious Mandalay Bay Resort and Casino in Las Vegas, all construction halted. To successfully complete the resort, the main tower's foundation needed additional support as it was sinking ½ to ¾ inch per week.

Like Mandalay Bay, many organizations find themselves in the same boat after years of operation - needing to strengthen their foundation to ensure sustainability and organizational success. To fortify the Las Vegas resort, 500 micropiles were sunk below its surface. In business, ensuring a lasting and successful organization requires foundational leadership at its core.

For the past two decades I have worked with leaders and leadership teams in various and diverse industries around the world, both big and small, good and bad. I have intently studied their behaviors and business results and uncovered three consistent traits by which foundational leaders support sustainable and successful organizations.

 

Running Your Business

running1Five Mistakes You're Making When Hiring Millennials

Suzanne Lucas, Inc.

 

An engineer got a job offer revoked when he posted to Quora asking for help in deciding between offers at Zenefits and Uber. Zenefits CEO Parker Conrad rescinded his company's offer. Business Insider calls his logic "brilliant." I agree — it brilliantly shows what is wrong with recruiting today.

When I first heard about this, I figured the engineer's question had been whiny, attack oriented or insulting to Zenefits or Uber. But, in fact, it was a well-reasoned pro-and-con list. The only problem was posting it publicly; it wasn't rude or inappropriate. But Conrad parachuted in and revoked the job offer, saying, "Definitely not Zenefits.... We really value people who 'get' what we do and who want to work here, specifically. It's not for everyone, but there are enough people out there who do want to work here that we can afford to be selective."

So, let me tell you why I think Conrad's response was not brilliant in a good way, and what is wrong with the hiring process in general.

running2Apple Watch Review: Is It Good for Business?

Brett Nuckles, Business News Daily

 

The Apple Watch can make you more productive, and it pairs nicely with business-casual dress - but so can other, less expensive smartwatches. That puts Apple's first wearable device in a bit of an awkward spot. It's an excellent product, but competing devices offer similar functionality at a fraction of the cost.

Fortunately, the Apple Watch does a lot to help justify its premium price. It offers a more polished interface than other smartwatches, as well as a bigger app library at launch than any other wearable operating system. You also get features you won't find on many other watches, like the ability to take phone calls. And like any good smartwatch, it ensures you'll never miss an important alert. Only iPhone owners need apply, though - the Apple Watch must be linked to one in order to function.

 

running3Ten Ways to Shorten Long Meetings

Dan Rockwell, Leadership Freak

 

Great meetings create efficiency.

The problem I'd like us to solve is spending too much time in long meetings. One CEO said she has to take her work home at night because her days are spent in meetings.

"...one either meets or one works. One can not do both at the same time." - Peter Drucker

 

Forward this email



This email was sent to odnetwork@odnetwork.org byodnetwork@odnetwork.org|

OD Network|2025 M Street NW|Suite 800|Washington|DC|20036

OD Network Connections May 2015
Facebook IconLinkedIn IconTwitter Icon
About OD Network >
About OD >
Membership >
Annual Conference >
Publications >
Resources >
Contact>
Calendar of Events

June 18, 2015
October 17-20, 2015
Chair
Matt MInahan, Ed.D.
Vice Chair
Sherry Duda
Treasurer
Magdy Mansour
Secretary
Yasmeen Burns
Christina Bell
Jaya Bohlmann
Marco Cassone
Loretta Hobbs
Norm Jones
Martha Kesler
Kris Lea
Zoe MacLeod
2025 M Street NW
Suite 800
Washington, DC 20036
312.321.5136


Each month, the Organization Development Network shares with its members articles from a number of journals to support the advancement of our members' OD practice.
Table of Contents

The Latest in OD:
Running Your Business:
The Latest in OD

firstAchievement Learning

Harry Hutson and Robert H. Schaffer - OD Practitioner


Taking Action Learning the Next Step Up

For years, leadership development professionals have understood the limitations of classroom raining and have experimented with a variety of learning modes that get the participants off the campus and into the world. For example, teams of learners may be challenged to study a topic that lies outside the expertise or responsibility of existing departments and make recommendationsto senior management. Or, teams may be asked to do a survey of employee opinion, an analysis of customer need, or an estimate of competitive threat. Team reports, as written or verbal resentations, can have positive influence, and at the same time the work involved in their preparation can teach valuable lessons about business and leadership.

IntroThe Iceberg of Organizational Cultural Change

Anton Ruis, Business2Community


Eighty seven percent of today's leaders around the world cite culture and employee engagement as one of their top organizational challenges. This is according to a recent report from Deloitte, who interviewed over 3,300 executives and HR leaders in 106 countries.

 

The data in this and other large-scale studies weave together an alarming trend around today's changing corporate landscape: Changing demands of the emerging workforce and looming leadership development challenges are growing risks for business today.

 

Article1Go Ahead, Fake Your Way through the 80-Hour Work Week

Rebecca Greenfield, Bloomberg Business


The 80-hour work week is a sham-at least for some of your savviest co-workers. A recent study outed a group of people, mostly men, who play the part of the workaholic, feigning brutal hours, while covertly keeping a more humane schedule. As their colleagues toil in their cubes, these efficient workers get home in time for dinner at 5:30 with their kids. The research, published in Organization Science and summarized inThe New York Times, calls the phenomenon "passing," because the cutters still got high performance reviews and promotions, despite putting in less time on the job.

 

Article212 Habits of Exceptional Leaders

Travis Bradberry, Entrepreneur

 

One of the most popular Dilbert comic strips in the cartoon's history begins with Dilbert's boss relaying senior leadership's explanation for the company's low profits. In response to his boss, Dilbert asks incredulously, "So they're saying that profits went up because of great leadership and down because of a weak economy?" To which Dilbert's boss replies, "These meetings will go faster if you stop putting things in context."

 

Article3Organizational Culture: An Aphorism Is "Worth a Thousand Words"

Samantha Goldman, Business 2 Community

 

In our daily lives and our daily work, we are undoubtedly impacted by subconscious messages that we have been socialized to accept. Often these are reflected in the choice of leaders that our society venerates. Other times, these messages enter our lives via quotes, mottos or aphorisms, such as, "if it ain't broke, don't fix it" that are so common they are often cliché.

 

Though they may seem harmless in everyday use, these mantras are incredibly powerful, simplistic guideposts on our thinking and how we prioritize our time and attention. For example, how many colleagues do you know who seem to operate according to the principle, "if you want something done right, you got to do it yourself?" or, "if you want something done, give it to a busy person?"

Article4The Strategist CFO: Four Orientations for Engaging in the Strategy Process

The Wall Street Journal

CEOs and boards increasingly want CFOs to not only deliver a finance organization that gets the numbers right, but also partner with them in shaping the company's strategy. But when asked what they want from a strategic CFO, their answers vary widely.

For example, CEOs typically want their CFOs to look around corners for new opportunities and potential black swans as well as help transform the company's products and markets, capitalize and plan for future growth, create and effectively communicate the corporate growth story, and improve decision-making around key investments. At the same time, boards have their own expectations concerning risk management, protecting the company's reputation and compliance and regulatory matters, among others.

Given this varied mix of responses, where should CFOs focus, and how should they orient themselves to supporting strategy?

Article5Amping Up Employee Tech Skills Is a Bargain with These Four Tools

Heather R. Huhman, Entrepreneur

 

Sharp tech talent is getting harder to find. In fact, new research suggests that American workers lag behind their international peers when it comes to tech skills.

 

Educational Testing Service surveyed adults 16-34 years of age across 22 countries measuring different competencies and published the results in January. A category called "problem solving in technology-rich environments" measured how well participants understood and effectively interacted with technology. U.S. millennials scored lower than 15 of the 19 countries participating in that category.

 

That's unfortunate, considering the rising need for tech skills and the availability of apps and e-courses for little to no cost. Tech training doesn't have to break the bank.

Article6Six Developments Impacting Field Service

John Cameron, Business 2 Community


With so many sophisticated tools now available to optimize field service operations, organizations have reached an unprecedented stage in their evolution. By leveraging developments in technology such as smartphone and tablet integration and advanced analytics, these businesses are reinventing themselves as predictive, rather than reactive, operations.

As the changes continue, field service organizations will assess how much they've evolved in the industry and set goals for the decade and beyond. This means equipping technicians with intelligent tools to deliver real-time data and deploy analytics capabilities to make strategic decisions, enhance security and optimize the IT infrastructure.

Article7This Is Why Leadership Requires Mentorship

John Brandon, Inc.com

 

Failure is an option in entrepreneurship. In fact, it's a required step on the path to success. Without failure, you can't really figure out how to push ahead, how to change, and how to succeed. Interestingly, one of the dynamics at play in this process of failure on the path to success must always involve a smart and capable guidance counselor.

Wait — does this mean going back to business school?

Not really. Finding a mentor is important when you are leading a business because that is the person you need in close proximity to help you through failure. There will be times when you will need to rely on this person's wisdom and experience. Instead of figuring out how to get through a crisis on your own, this person will be the one who supports you.

Article8Best Advice I Ever Got: Avoid Advice and Look to Yourself for Solutions First

Vivek Sharma, Inc.com


There's a certain irony in peddling advice about avoiding advice. However, I picked up this bit of wisdom early in my career, and it's proved useful for both working in and building a company.
Make no mistake: Learning from others is paramount to business success. But there's inherent value in trying to solve problems on your own.

This philosophy cemented itself into my psyche when I was working at one of my first postgraduate jobs in the San Francisco Bay Area in 1998. I joined the Blue Martini core engineering team, working with many of the people who had helped build Netscape.

Article10Three Easy Cultural Shifts to Help Engage Your Employees

The Wall Street Journal

 

Food for thought: In 2013, the percentage of Americans who believed there was at least a small chance of a zombie apocalypse was greater than the percentage of individuals worldwide who said they were engaged in their work. Truth be told, the percentage of Americans who report feeling engaged at work is actually much higher than the global number-coming in at a whopping 31.5 percent in 2014, according to a Gallup survey. As one might expect, the engagement level of managers and leaders is higher, but it isn't grounds for celebration; 38.4 percent of respondents say they are engaged by their work responsibilities. But that means 61.6 percent of surveyed managers in business and government don't really care.

 

Article1110 Low-Cost Options for Customized Leadership Development

Caroline Ceniza-Levine, Forbes

 

A recent Global Workforce Leadership Survey released by Saba, a cloud-based talent management solutions company, and WorkplaceTrends.com, a research firm, report a growing talent gap at the executive levels:

  • Almost half (46 percent) of companies surveyed cited leadership as the skill hardest to find.
  • Only 15 percent of employees feel the training they get prepares them for the next position.

If you're an aspiring leader, the good news is that employers feel the need for more leaders. The bad news is that existing training doesn't appear to meet that need. Of course, you should still take advantage of the leadership development resources your current employer offers. But if you're in transition or at a company with few or no resources, you will have to create your own leadership program.

Article12The Three Fundamental Leadership Traits that Support Enduring Organizations

Louis Efron, Forbes

 

Near the completion of the luxurious Mandalay Bay Resort and Casino in Las Vegas, all construction halted. To successfully complete the resort, the main tower's foundation needed additional support as it was sinking ½ to ¾ inch per week.

Like Mandalay Bay, many organizations find themselves in the same boat after years of operation - needing to strengthen their foundation to ensure sustainability and organizational success. To fortify the Las Vegas resort, 500 micropiles were sunk below its surface. In business, ensuring a lasting and successful organization requires foundational leadership at its core.

For the past two decades I have worked with leaders and leadership teams in various and diverse industries around the world, both big and small, good and bad. I have intently studied their behaviors and business results and uncovered three consistent traits by which foundational leaders support sustainable and successful organizations.

 

Running Your Business

running1Five Mistakes You're Making When Hiring Millennials

Suzanne Lucas, Inc.

 

An engineer got a job offer revoked when he posted to Quora asking for help in deciding between offers at Zenefits and Uber. Zenefits CEO Parker Conrad rescinded his company's offer. Business Insider calls his logic "brilliant." I agree — it brilliantly shows what is wrong with recruiting today.

When I first heard about this, I figured the engineer's question had been whiny, attack oriented or insulting to Zenefits or Uber. But, in fact, it was a well-reasoned pro-and-con list. The only problem was posting it publicly; it wasn't rude or inappropriate. But Conrad parachuted in and revoked the job offer, saying, "Definitely not Zenefits.... We really value people who 'get' what we do and who want to work here, specifically. It's not for everyone, but there are enough people out there who do want to work here that we can afford to be selective."

So, let me tell you why I think Conrad's response was not brilliant in a good way, and what is wrong with the hiring process in general.

running2Apple Watch Review: Is It Good for Business?

Brett Nuckles, Business News Daily

 

The Apple Watch can make you more productive, and it pairs nicely with business-casual dress - but so can other, less expensive smartwatches. That puts Apple's first wearable device in a bit of an awkward spot. It's an excellent product, but competing devices offer similar functionality at a fraction of the cost.

Fortunately, the Apple Watch does a lot to help justify its premium price. It offers a more polished interface than other smartwatches, as well as a bigger app library at launch than any other wearable operating system. You also get features you won't find on many other watches, like the ability to take phone calls. And like any good smartwatch, it ensures you'll never miss an important alert. Only iPhone owners need apply, though - the Apple Watch must be linked to one in order to function.

 

running3Ten Ways to Shorten Long Meetings

Dan Rockwell, Leadership Freak

 

Great meetings create efficiency.

The problem I'd like us to solve is spending too much time in long meetings. One CEO said she has to take her work home at night because her days are spent in meetings.

"...one either meets or one works. One can not do both at the same time." - Peter Drucker

 

Forward this email



This email was sent to odnetwork@odnetwork.org byodnetwork@odnetwork.org|

OD Network|2025 M Street NW|Suite 800|Washington|DC|20036
Forward this email



This email was sent to odnetwork@odnetwork.org byodnetwork@odnetwork.org|

OD Network|2025 M Street NW|Suite 800|Washington|DC|20036
OD Network Connections May 2015
Facebook IconLinkedIn IconTwitter Icon
About OD Network >
About OD >
Membership >
Annual Conference >
Publications >
Resources >
Contact>
Calendar of Events

June 18, 2015
October 17-20, 2015
Chair
Matt MInahan, Ed.D.
Vice Chair
Sherry Duda
Treasurer
Magdy Mansour
Secretary
Yasmeen Burns
Christina Bell
Jaya Bohlmann
Marco Cassone
Loretta Hobbs
Norm Jones
Martha Kesler
Kris Lea
Zoe MacLeod
2025 M Street NW
Suite 800
Washington, DC 20036
312.321.5136


Each month, the Organization Development Network shares with its members articles from a number of journals to support the advancement of our members' OD practice.
Table of Contents

The Latest in OD:
Running Your Business:
The Latest in OD

firstAchievement Learning

Harry Hutson and Robert H. Schaffer - OD Practitioner


Taking Action Learning the Next Step Up

For years, leadership development professionals have understood the limitations of classroom raining and have experimented with a variety of learning modes that get the participants off the campus and into the world. For example, teams of learners may be challenged to study a topic that lies outside the expertise or responsibility of existing departments and make recommendationsto senior management. Or, teams may be asked to do a survey of employee opinion, an analysis of customer need, or an estimate of competitive threat. Team reports, as written or verbal resentations, can have positive influence, and at the same time the work involved in their preparation can teach valuable lessons about business and leadership.

IntroThe Iceberg of Organizational Cultural Change

Anton Ruis, Business2Community


Eighty seven percent of today's leaders around the world cite culture and employee engagement as one of their top organizational challenges. This is according to a recent report from Deloitte, who interviewed over 3,300 executives and HR leaders in 106 countries.

 

The data in this and other large-scale studies weave together an alarming trend around today's changing corporate landscape: Changing demands of the emerging workforce and looming leadership development challenges are growing risks for business today.

 

Article1Go Ahead, Fake Your Way through the 80-Hour Work Week

Rebecca Greenfield, Bloomberg Business


The 80-hour work week is a sham-at least for some of your savviest co-workers. A recent study outed a group of people, mostly men, who play the part of the workaholic, feigning brutal hours, while covertly keeping a more humane schedule. As their colleagues toil in their cubes, these efficient workers get home in time for dinner at 5:30 with their kids. The research, published in Organization Science and summarized inThe New York Times, calls the phenomenon "passing," because the cutters still got high performance reviews and promotions, despite putting in less time on the job.

 

Article212 Habits of Exceptional Leaders

Travis Bradberry, Entrepreneur

 

One of the most popular Dilbert comic strips in the cartoon's history begins with Dilbert's boss relaying senior leadership's explanation for the company's low profits. In response to his boss, Dilbert asks incredulously, "So they're saying that profits went up because of great leadership and down because of a weak economy?" To which Dilbert's boss replies, "These meetings will go faster if you stop putting things in context."

 

Article3Organizational Culture: An Aphorism Is "Worth a Thousand Words"

Samantha Goldman, Business 2 Community

 

In our daily lives and our daily work, we are undoubtedly impacted by subconscious messages that we have been socialized to accept. Often these are reflected in the choice of leaders that our society venerates. Other times, these messages enter our lives via quotes, mottos or aphorisms, such as, "if it ain't broke, don't fix it" that are so common they are often cliché.

 

Though they may seem harmless in everyday use, these mantras are incredibly powerful, simplistic guideposts on our thinking and how we prioritize our time and attention. For example, how many colleagues do you know who seem to operate according to the principle, "if you want something done right, you got to do it yourself?" or, "if you want something done, give it to a busy person?"

Article4The Strategist CFO: Four Orientations for Engaging in the Strategy Process

The Wall Street Journal

CEOs and boards increasingly want CFOs to not only deliver a finance organization that gets the numbers right, but also partner with them in shaping the company's strategy. But when asked what they want from a strategic CFO, their answers vary widely.

For example, CEOs typically want their CFOs to look around corners for new opportunities and potential black swans as well as help transform the company's products and markets, capitalize and plan for future growth, create and effectively communicate the corporate growth story, and improve decision-making around key investments. At the same time, boards have their own expectations concerning risk management, protecting the company's reputation and compliance and regulatory matters, among others.

Given this varied mix of responses, where should CFOs focus, and how should they orient themselves to supporting strategy?

Article5Amping Up Employee Tech Skills Is a Bargain with These Four Tools

Heather R. Huhman, Entrepreneur

 

Sharp tech talent is getting harder to find. In fact, new research suggests that American workers lag behind their international peers when it comes to tech skills.

 

Educational Testing Service surveyed adults 16-34 years of age across 22 countries measuring different competencies and published the results in January. A category called "problem solving in technology-rich environments" measured how well participants understood and effectively interacted with technology. U.S. millennials scored lower than 15 of the 19 countries participating in that category.

 

That's unfortunate, considering the rising need for tech skills and the availability of apps and e-courses for little to no cost. Tech training doesn't have to break the bank.

Article6Six Developments Impacting Field Service

John Cameron, Business 2 Community


With so many sophisticated tools now available to optimize field service operations, organizations have reached an unprecedented stage in their evolution. By leveraging developments in technology such as smartphone and tablet integration and advanced analytics, these businesses are reinventing themselves as predictive, rather than reactive, operations.

As the changes continue, field service organizations will assess how much they've evolved in the industry and set goals for the decade and beyond. This means equipping technicians with intelligent tools to deliver real-time data and deploy analytics capabilities to make strategic decisions, enhance security and optimize the IT infrastructure.

Article7This Is Why Leadership Requires Mentorship

John Brandon, Inc.com

 

Failure is an option in entrepreneurship. In fact, it's a required step on the path to success. Without failure, you can't really figure out how to push ahead, how to change, and how to succeed. Interestingly, one of the dynamics at play in this process of failure on the path to success must always involve a smart and capable guidance counselor.

Wait — does this mean going back to business school?

Not really. Finding a mentor is important when you are leading a business because that is the person you need in close proximity to help you through failure. There will be times when you will need to rely on this person's wisdom and experience. Instead of figuring out how to get through a crisis on your own, this person will be the one who supports you.

Article8Best Advice I Ever Got: Avoid Advice and Look to Yourself for Solutions First

Vivek Sharma, Inc.com


There's a certain irony in peddling advice about avoiding advice. However, I picked up this bit of wisdom early in my career, and it's proved useful for both working in and building a company.
Make no mistake: Learning from others is paramount to business success. But there's inherent value in trying to solve problems on your own.

This philosophy cemented itself into my psyche when I was working at one of my first postgraduate jobs in the San Francisco Bay Area in 1998. I joined the Blue Martini core engineering team, working with many of the people who had helped build Netscape.

Article10Three Easy Cultural Shifts to Help Engage Your Employees

The Wall Street Journal

 

Food for thought: In 2013, the percentage of Americans who believed there was at least a small chance of a zombie apocalypse was greater than the percentage of individuals worldwide who said they were engaged in their work. Truth be told, the percentage of Americans who report feeling engaged at work is actually much higher than the global number-coming in at a whopping 31.5 percent in 2014, according to a Gallup survey. As one might expect, the engagement level of managers and leaders is higher, but it isn't grounds for celebration; 38.4 percent of respondents say they are engaged by their work responsibilities. But that means 61.6 percent of surveyed managers in business and government don't really care.

 

Article1110 Low-Cost Options for Customized Leadership Development

Caroline Ceniza-Levine, Forbes

 

A recent Global Workforce Leadership Survey released by Saba, a cloud-based talent management solutions company, and WorkplaceTrends.com, a research firm, report a growing talent gap at the executive levels:

  • Almost half (46 percent) of companies surveyed cited leadership as the skill hardest to find.
  • Only 15 percent of employees feel the training they get prepares them for the next position.

If you're an aspiring leader, the good news is that employers feel the need for more leaders. The bad news is that existing training doesn't appear to meet that need. Of course, you should still take advantage of the leadership development resources your current employer offers. But if you're in transition or at a company with few or no resources, you will have to create your own leadership program.

Article12The Three Fundamental Leadership Traits that Support Enduring Organizations

Louis Efron, Forbes

 

Near the completion of the luxurious Mandalay Bay Resort and Casino in Las Vegas, all construction halted. To successfully complete the resort, the main tower's foundation needed additional support as it was sinking ½ to ¾ inch per week.

Like Mandalay Bay, many organizations find themselves in the same boat after years of operation - needing to strengthen their foundation to ensure sustainability and organizational success. To fortify the Las Vegas resort, 500 micropiles were sunk below its surface. In business, ensuring a lasting and successful organization requires foundational leadership at its core.

For the past two decades I have worked with leaders and leadership teams in various and diverse industries around the world, both big and small, good and bad. I have intently studied their behaviors and business results and uncovered three consistent traits by which foundational leaders support sustainable and successful organizations.

 

Running Your Business

running1Five Mistakes You're Making When Hiring Millennials

Suzanne Lucas, Inc.

 

An engineer got a job offer revoked when he posted to Quora asking for help in deciding between offers at Zenefits and Uber. Zenefits CEO Parker Conrad rescinded his company's offer. Business Insider calls his logic "brilliant." I agree — it brilliantly shows what is wrong with recruiting today.

When I first heard about this, I figured the engineer's question had been whiny, attack oriented or insulting to Zenefits or Uber. But, in fact, it was a well-reasoned pro-and-con list. The only problem was posting it publicly; it wasn't rude or inappropriate. But Conrad parachuted in and revoked the job offer, saying, "Definitely not Zenefits.... We really value people who 'get' what we do and who want to work here, specifically. It's not for everyone, but there are enough people out there who do want to work here that we can afford to be selective."

So, let me tell you why I think Conrad's response was not brilliant in a good way, and what is wrong with the hiring process in general.

running2Apple Watch Review: Is It Good for Business?

Brett Nuckles, Business News Daily

 

The Apple Watch can make you more productive, and it pairs nicely with business-casual dress - but so can other, less expensive smartwatches. That puts Apple's first wearable device in a bit of an awkward spot. It's an excellent product, but competing devices offer similar functionality at a fraction of the cost.

Fortunately, the Apple Watch does a lot to help justify its premium price. It offers a more polished interface than other smartwatches, as well as a bigger app library at launch than any other wearable operating system. You also get features you won't find on many other watches, like the ability to take phone calls. And like any good smartwatch, it ensures you'll never miss an important alert. Only iPhone owners need apply, though - the Apple Watch must be linked to one in order to function.

 

running3Ten Ways to Shorten Long Meetings

Dan Rockwell, Leadership Freak

 

Great meetings create efficiency.

The problem I'd like us to solve is spending too much time in long meetings. One CEO said she has to take her work home at night because her days are spent in meetings.

"...one either meets or one works. One can not do both at the same time." - Peter Drucker

 

Forward this email



This email was sent to odnetwork@odnetwork.org byodnetwork@odnetwork.org|

OD Network|2025 M Street NW|Suite 800|Washington|DC|20036
Forward this email



This email was sent to odnetwork@odnetwork.org byodnetwork@odnetwork.org|

OD Network|2025 M Street NW|Suite 800|Washington|DC|20036
OD Network Connections May 2015
Facebook IconLinkedIn IconTwitter Icon
About OD Network >
About OD >
Membership >
Annual Conference >
Publications >
Resources >
Contact>
Calendar of Events

June 18, 2015
October 17-20, 2015
Chair
Matt MInahan, Ed.D.
Vice Chair
Sherry Duda
Treasurer
Magdy Mansour
Secretary
Yasmeen Burns
Christina Bell
Jaya Bohlmann
Marco Cassone
Loretta Hobbs
Norm Jones
Martha Kesler
Kris Lea
Zoe MacLeod
2025 M Street NW
Suite 800
Washington, DC 20036
312.321.5136


Each month, the Organization Development Network shares with its members articles from a number of journals to support the advancement of our members' OD practice.
Table of Contents

The Latest in OD:
Running Your Business:
The Latest in OD

firstAchievement Learning

Harry Hutson and Robert H. Schaffer - OD Practitioner


Taking Action Learning the Next Step Up

For years, leadership development professionals have understood the limitations of classroom raining and have experimented with a variety of learning modes that get the participants off the campus and into the world. For example, teams of learners may be challenged to study a topic that lies outside the expertise or responsibility of existing departments and make recommendationsto senior management. Or, teams may be asked to do a survey of employee opinion, an analysis of customer need, or an estimate of competitive threat. Team reports, as written or verbal resentations, can have positive influence, and at the same time the work involved in their preparation can teach valuable lessons about business and leadership.

IntroThe Iceberg of Organizational Cultural Change

Anton Ruis, Business2Community


Eighty seven percent of today's leaders around the world cite culture and employee engagement as one of their top organizational challenges. This is according to a recent report from Deloitte, who interviewed over 3,300 executives and HR leaders in 106 countries.

 

The data in this and other large-scale studies weave together an alarming trend around today's changing corporate landscape: Changing demands of the emerging workforce and looming leadership development challenges are growing risks for business today.

 

Article1Go Ahead, Fake Your Way through the 80-Hour Work Week

Rebecca Greenfield, Bloomberg Business


The 80-hour work week is a sham-at least for some of your savviest co-workers. A recent study outed a group of people, mostly men, who play the part of the workaholic, feigning brutal hours, while covertly keeping a more humane schedule. As their colleagues toil in their cubes, these efficient workers get home in time for dinner at 5:30 with their kids. The research, published in Organization Science and summarized inThe New York Times, calls the phenomenon "passing," because the cutters still got high performance reviews and promotions, despite putting in less time on the job.

 

Article212 Habits of Exceptional Leaders

Travis Bradberry, Entrepreneur

 

One of the most popular Dilbert comic strips in the cartoon's history begins with Dilbert's boss relaying senior leadership's explanation for the company's low profits. In response to his boss, Dilbert asks incredulously, "So they're saying that profits went up because of great leadership and down because of a weak economy?" To which Dilbert's boss replies, "These meetings will go faster if you stop putting things in context."

 

Article3Organizational Culture: An Aphorism Is "Worth a Thousand Words"

Samantha Goldman, Business 2 Community

 

In our daily lives and our daily work, we are undoubtedly impacted by subconscious messages that we have been socialized to accept. Often these are reflected in the choice of leaders that our society venerates. Other times, these messages enter our lives via quotes, mottos or aphorisms, such as, "if it ain't broke, don't fix it" that are so common they are often cliché.

 

Though they may seem harmless in everyday use, these mantras are incredibly powerful, simplistic guideposts on our thinking and how we prioritize our time and attention. For example, how many colleagues do you know who seem to operate according to the principle, "if you want something done right, you got to do it yourself?" or, "if you want something done, give it to a busy person?"

Article4The Strategist CFO: Four Orientations for Engaging in the Strategy Process

The Wall Street Journal

CEOs and boards increasingly want CFOs to not only deliver a finance organization that gets the numbers right, but also partner with them in shaping the company's strategy. But when asked what they want from a strategic CFO, their answers vary widely.

For example, CEOs typically want their CFOs to look around corners for new opportunities and potential black swans as well as help transform the company's products and markets, capitalize and plan for future growth, create and effectively communicate the corporate growth story, and improve decision-making around key investments. At the same time, boards have their own expectations concerning risk management, protecting the company's reputation and compliance and regulatory matters, among others.

Given this varied mix of responses, where should CFOs focus, and how should they orient themselves to supporting strategy?

Article5Amping Up Employee Tech Skills Is a Bargain with These Four Tools

Heather R. Huhman, Entrepreneur

 

Sharp tech talent is getting harder to find. In fact, new research suggests that American workers lag behind their international peers when it comes to tech skills.

 

Educational Testing Service surveyed adults 16-34 years of age across 22 countries measuring different competencies and published the results in January. A category called "problem solving in technology-rich environments" measured how well participants understood and effectively interacted with technology. U.S. millennials scored lower than 15 of the 19 countries participating in that category.

 

That's unfortunate, considering the rising need for tech skills and the availability of apps and e-courses for little to no cost. Tech training doesn't have to break the bank.

Article6Six Developments Impacting Field Service

John Cameron, Business 2 Community


With so many sophisticated tools now available to optimize field service operations, organizations have reached an unprecedented stage in their evolution. By leveraging developments in technology such as smartphone and tablet integration and advanced analytics, these businesses are reinventing themselves as predictive, rather than reactive, operations.

As the changes continue, field service organizations will assess how much they've evolved in the industry and set goals for the decade and beyond. This means equipping technicians with intelligent tools to deliver real-time data and deploy analytics capabilities to make strategic decisions, enhance security and optimize the IT infrastructure.

Article7This Is Why Leadership Requires Mentorship

John Brandon, Inc.com

 

Failure is an option in entrepreneurship. In fact, it's a required step on the path to success. Without failure, you can't really figure out how to push ahead, how to change, and how to succeed. Interestingly, one of the dynamics at play in this process of failure on the path to success must always involve a smart and capable guidance counselor.

Wait — does this mean going back to business school?

Not really. Finding a mentor is important when you are leading a business because that is the person you need in close proximity to help you through failure. There will be times when you will need to rely on this person's wisdom and experience. Instead of figuring out how to get through a crisis on your own, this person will be the one who supports you.

Article8Best Advice I Ever Got: Avoid Advice and Look to Yourself for Solutions First

Vivek Sharma, Inc.com


There's a certain irony in peddling advice about avoiding advice. However, I picked up this bit of wisdom early in my career, and it's proved useful for both working in and building a company.
Make no mistake: Learning from others is paramount to business success. But there's inherent value in trying to solve problems on your own.

This philosophy cemented itself into my psyche when I was working at one of my first postgraduate jobs in the San Francisco Bay Area in 1998. I joined the Blue Martini core engineering team, working with many of the people who had helped build Netscape.

Article10Three Easy Cultural Shifts to Help Engage Your Employees

The Wall Street Journal

 

Food for thought: In 2013, the percentage of Americans who believed there was at least a small chance of a zombie apocalypse was greater than the percentage of individuals worldwide who said they were engaged in their work. Truth be told, the percentage of Americans who report feeling engaged at work is actually much higher than the global number-coming in at a whopping 31.5 percent in 2014, according to a Gallup survey. As one might expect, the engagement level of managers and leaders is higher, but it isn't grounds for celebration; 38.4 percent of respondents say they are engaged by their work responsibilities. But that means 61.6 percent of surveyed managers in business and government don't really care.

 

Article1110 Low-Cost Options for Customized Leadership Development

Caroline Ceniza-Levine, Forbes

 

A recent Global Workforce Leadership Survey released by Saba, a cloud-based talent management solutions company, and WorkplaceTrends.com, a research firm, report a growing talent gap at the executive levels:

  • Almost half (46 percent) of companies surveyed cited leadership as the skill hardest to find.
  • Only 15 percent of employees feel the training they get prepares them for the next position.

If you're an aspiring leader, the good news is that employers feel the need for more leaders. The bad news is that existing training doesn't appear to meet that need. Of course, you should still take advantage of the leadership development resources your current employer offers. But if you're in transition or at a company with few or no resources, you will have to create your own leadership program.

Article12The Three Fundamental Leadership Traits that Support Enduring Organizations

Louis Efron, Forbes

 

Near the completion of the luxurious Mandalay Bay Resort and Casino in Las Vegas, all construction halted. To successfully complete the resort, the main tower's foundation needed additional support as it was sinking ½ to ¾ inch per week.

Like Mandalay Bay, many organizations find themselves in the same boat after years of operation - needing to strengthen their foundation to ensure sustainability and organizational success. To fortify the Las Vegas resort, 500 micropiles were sunk below its surface. In business, ensuring a lasting and successful organization requires foundational leadership at its core.

For the past two decades I have worked with leaders and leadership teams in various and diverse industries around the world, both big and small, good and bad. I have intently studied their behaviors and business results and uncovered three consistent traits by which foundational leaders support sustainable and successful organizations.

 

Running Your Business

running1Five Mistakes You're Making When Hiring Millennials

Suzanne Lucas, Inc.

 

An engineer got a job offer revoked when he posted to Quora asking for help in deciding between offers at Zenefits and Uber. Zenefits CEO Parker Conrad rescinded his company's offer. Business Insider calls his logic "brilliant." I agree — it brilliantly shows what is wrong with recruiting today.

When I first heard about this, I figured the engineer's question had been whiny, attack oriented or insulting to Zenefits or Uber. But, in fact, it was a well-reasoned pro-and-con list. The only problem was posting it publicly; it wasn't rude or inappropriate. But Conrad parachuted in and revoked the job offer, saying, "Definitely not Zenefits.... We really value people who 'get' what we do and who want to work here, specifically. It's not for everyone, but there are enough people out there who do want to work here that we can afford to be selective."

So, let me tell you why I think Conrad's response was not brilliant in a good way, and what is wrong with the hiring process in general.

running2Apple Watch Review: Is It Good for Business?

Brett Nuckles, Business News Daily

 

The Apple Watch can make you more productive, and it pairs nicely with business-casual dress - but so can other, less expensive smartwatches. That puts Apple's first wearable device in a bit of an awkward spot. It's an excellent product, but competing devices offer similar functionality at a fraction of the cost.

Fortunately, the Apple Watch does a lot to help justify its premium price. It offers a more polished interface than other smartwatches, as well as a bigger app library at launch than any other wearable operating system. You also get features you won't find on many other watches, like the ability to take phone calls. And like any good smartwatch, it ensures you'll never miss an important alert. Only iPhone owners need apply, though - the Apple Watch must be linked to one in order to function.

 

running3Ten Ways to Shorten Long Meetings

Dan Rockwell, Leadership Freak

 

Great meetings create efficiency.

The problem I'd like us to solve is spending too much time in long meetings. One CEO said she has to take her work home at night because her days are spent in meetings.

"...one either meets or one works. One can not do both at the same time." - Peter Drucker

 

Forward this email



This email was sent to odnetwork@odnetwork.org byodnetwork@odnetwork.org|

OD Network|2025 M Street NW|Suite 800|Washington|DC|20036